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Life’s Beginning Until Birth

Preface

Pictures Of Life's Beginnings Until Birth - Pictorial Atlas
Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD
Lana B. Shettles-Callahan, BFA

* Photos by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.*

"The impetus for this pictorial presentation of life’s beginnings is to give those who are to be born the best possible beginning in life. It is our hope that the prospective mother will wish to know all she can know about this microscopic spec of protoplasm with growth and development for the nine months of life.

If we could point to a single point in this presentation, it would be simply that life on this planet has survived in its various forms until today. Most people have inherited the ability to pass that life along to another individual. But every such individual is a chance composite of two direct lines of inheritance and is human, every way unique and different from all other individuals.

Since each child inherits a heritage from the past and is a link with the future, this privilege of life is to be cherished, guarded and nourished with all the modern resources and knowledge available. In such a manner, life on this earth can be improved."

Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
From thousands only one sperm cell penetrates an egg (in an approx. 12 o'clock position). The fusion of sperm and ash cell marks the beginning of a new life.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
The sperm cell with the larger and more elongated head is the carrier of an X chromosome, to fertilize the egg an have a girl (left). The sperm with the oval head, which bases a Y chromosome, makes a boy.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
The egg immediately after it is released is covered with thousands of protective cells.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
A human in 30 hours. Here happens the first division of the fertilized egg, approaching the 2-cell stage. There will eventually of this one fertilized egg become billions of cells.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
The early human ‘blastocyst' 4 days after fertilization. That new life will at this stage attach itself to the lining of the uterus. Implantation does not begin for 2-3 days after.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
An egg solidly implanted in uterine lining, about 12 days after fertilization where it will be the rest of the pregnancy.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
1 month old embryo. That has already the facilities of most larger organs. A single cell becomes millions of cells.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Side view: An embryo of 37 days.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Front view: An embryo of 37 days
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Back view: An embryo of 37 days.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Fetus 2 months old - amniotic fluid, umbilical cord, and placenta.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
11-week-old twins. They each have their own umbilical cord and placenta
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
The hand develops from a "loofah-like" structure in the 5th week to fingers with swimming skin in the 6th week . Clearly separated fingers in the 7th or 8th week. The feet through similar development.
Skeletal development after 3 months
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
A 12-week-old fetus seen in relation to an adult human hand.
A 16-week-old fetus sucking on the thumb
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Fetus at 20 weeks. The placenta has been opened to show the fetus in its 'water sac'..
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Fetus, placenta and umbilical cord in 8th month.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Fetus at 24 weeks.
Photo by Landrum B. Shettles M.D, PhD. Copyrighted Material.
Landrum B. Shettles, M.D., Ph.D. delivers healthy baby girl.

Landrum quotes Santiago Raymon y Cajal who once said:

“To be right before the right time is heresy, sometimes to be paid for by martyrdom.”